Brown Grehhound resting on the grass after a race

Why You Should Adopt a Greyhound

Please consider adopting a Greyhound. Even though Greyhound racing is losing popularity, several areas in the United States and around the world still have racetracks, and many retired hounds need good homes.

Greyhounds used for racing often have injuries, are sometimes underfed, and are given steroids. They are commonly neglected and exploited and can sometimes die due to overuse and injury. These beautiful animals are often euthanized when their racing days are over, and some are sold to “Closed Colony” blood banks for blood donations for other Greyhounds. Fortunately, some states such as California have made these blood banks illegal.

The good news is that more and more states are closing down Greyhound racetracks and many Greyhounds are now ready for adoption into a loving home. Please consider adopting one of these graceful, sweet dogs. They make great family dogs and do very well in small spaces despite their size. You will be giving a deserving hound the right to live in peace and freedom in a caring environment.

Why Greyhounds Make Great Family Dogs

You should definitely consider adopting a Greyhound as they are very sweet, intelligent, and graceful dogs. Despite the fact that they can run up to 43 miles per hour, they actually prefer to be couch potatoes. These larger dogs do need some daily exercise, but they are quite content to live in a small space like an apartment or condo.

Greyhounds are great with kids and very gentle. They are used to being handled by vets so taking them to medical appointments is not a hassle. They are large dogs, but they don’t really take up that much space due to their lean bodies. Here is a list of Greyhound traits:

  • Gentle
  • Noble
  • Independent
  • Mellow
  • Intelligent and intuitive
  • Well-behaved
  • Good-natured
  • Can form deep bonds with humans

Luckily, as abuse of Greyhounds has gained more attention, many places are shutting down Greyhound racing. The State of Florida passed legislation in 2020 to ban racing and many Greyhounds have since been retired. Several wonderful rescue groups have sprung into action over the past several years to rescue Greyhounds. These organizations provide medical care and rehabilitation prior to placing them in foster and forever homes. Hundreds of retired Greyhounds are now ready for adoption. Some people are concerned that it is hard to adopt a Greyhound, but for the most part, it is fairly easy, (click here to read more).

Considerations When Adopting a Greyhound

Although Greyhounds do well in small homes, they do need access to a large enclosed space to be able to gallop around for 20 or 30 minutes each day. So, a local dog park or a friend’s large property may be helpful if you have a small yard or patio.

They are very sensitive dogs and may get upset in a household that is not harmonious. Their independent nature can cause them to be resistant at times and housebreaking may be a bit more of a challenge.

And, Greyhounds are prone to some forms of cancer and digestive problems that can be fatal.

Other things to think about are the support that some Greyhounds may need for a long time due to prior mistreatment or physical neglect and abuse. However, rescue groups do a great job with initial rehab and foster families are very effective in preparing these deserving dogs for adoption.

Be sure to see my posts about How to Heal and Comfort a Rescue Dog for a lot more information about what to expect.

Where to Adopt a Greyhound

I have listed some reputable rescue groups that I have researched or become familiar with. But I also urge you to check with your local shelter, as they may have the type of dog you are looking for. And, you may save a dog’s life. Some shelters have a “kill” policy after long stays or when their facility reaches capacity.

You may also be surprised by who you fall in love with or feel drawn toward the most when you visit a shelter. Be sure to see my post Everything You Need to Know About Adopting a Rescue Dog for a comprehensive guide.

My links below to organizations are just a sampling. There are many additional organizations that you may also want to work with. Make sure they are a reputable organization registered as a 501(c)3 nonprofit. You can check their status on Guidestar.org which often includes 3 years of tax returns.

One additional note, you should steer away from private groups, especially those online, since they may be puppy mills in disguise. Also, buying a dog from a pet store probably saves that dog’s life. But just know that pet stores usually get their dogs from puppy mills. So, in the long run, don’t support retailers who sell dogs by buying their products.

Two very reputable online services include Petfinders.com and AKC Rescue Network. They can help you find breed-specific dogs of various ages, including puppies and seniors.

Greyhound Adoption Center (Houndsavers.org)

Greyhound Adoption Center has been around for 30 years and owns a 3.5-acre facility near San Diego, California. Their primary facility can accommodate 60 dogs at their facility and support 20 foster families for dogs with medical needs. They connect with rescue networks across the United States. They are listed on Guidestar and have many great reviews, but do not have a rating.

Mission

OUR MISSION IS TO FIND LOVING HOMES FOR RESCUED DOGS, MOSTLY RACETRACK GREYHOUNDS, BUT ALSO NON-RACERS AND GREYHOUND MIXES. OUR GOAL IS TO SAVE AS MANY DOGS AS WE CAN WHILE MAINTAINING A QUALITY PROGRAM FOCUSED ON EACH INDIVIDUAL DOG AND PROSPECTIVE ADOPTERS’ NEEDS. TO THIS END, WE SERVE AS ADVOCATES FOR EACH PERSON ADOPTING AND EACH DOG WELCOMED INTO THEIR HOME AS FAMILY.

Contact Info:

Website: https://houndsavers.org/

Mailing Address:
Greyhound Adoption Center
PO Box 2433
La Mesa, CA 91943-2433

Adoption Kennel:
4821 Dehesa Rd.
El Cajon, CA 92019

Phone: (877) 478-8364

Greyhound Adoption League of Texas

Greyhound Adoption League of Texas has been around since 2001 and is a huge organization covering all of Northern America. Not only do they rescue, care for, and place retired racing Greyhounds, but they also save and heal Greyhounds used for hunting who have been neglected or abandoned.

They have received numerous awards since their inception and have a Platium rating on Guidestar.

Bridget is ready for adoption as of Sept. 5th, 2022

GALT’s Mission:

  • Assist all greyhounds, primarily those that are retired from or affiliated with the racing industry;
  • Facilitate placing greyhounds in loving, responsible, forever homes;
  • Educate the public about the desirability of adopting greyhounds as companions and family pets in the home;
  • Stress the importance of spay and neuter as a means of controlling the number of unwanted animals;
  • Support, welcome and encourage an active, organized volunteer base of greyhound lovers who share the passion and vision of finding loving, responsible, forever homes for greyhounds to live out their natural lives;
  • Provide continuing educational support to the greyhound’s family after placement to ensure a successful adoption;
  • Connect with other groups and people that assist and adopt greyhounds to promote adoption worldwide;
  • Endeavor also to assist greyhound mixes, other large sighthounds and large sighthound mixes; and most of all,
  • Enjoy the spiritual connection we all share with greyhounds and each other in loving and helping one of the most loving and loyal creatures put on this earth.

Contact Info:

Website: https://galtx.org/available/

3400 Carlisle St #430
Dallas, TX 75204-1265
972-503-4258
info@galtx.org

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